Disc Protusion

Bandscheibenvorfall

If we bounce, dance, jump and run, upset all these movements our backs.

"Slipped disc” What people think of hearing “ slipped disc” - is a prolapsed or herniated disc. It can happen when a spinal disc becomes less elastic and may rupture. If that happens, a portion of the spinal disc pushes outside which is called a “herniated disc”. When it bulges out from between the vertebrae, the spinal nerves and spinal cord probably get pinched. Normally there is a small extra space around the spinal cord and the spinal nerves, but if there was enough of the herniated disc pushed out of space it is possible that these structures are compressed.

Often the pain is severe, and usually it comes on suddenly. Sometimes it can be eased by lying down flat with the legs high. Often it feels bad to move, cough or sneeze.

Many different symptoms can be experienced in this region and comprehensive and professional assessment by one of our Physiotherapists will enable your problem to be managed in the most effective way.

Nerve root pain - “sciatica” Nerve root pain occurs because a nerve coming from the spinal cord is pressed on (“trapped”) by a prolapsed disc or is irritated by an inflammation caused by the prolapsed disc. Although the problem comes from the back you may feel pain along the course of the nerve in addition to back pain. You may feel pain in leg, calf or foot. With a prolapsed disc the sciatic nerve is the most commonly affected nerve. It is large and made up from several smaller nerves that come out from the cord in the lower back. It travels deep inside the buttock and down the back of the leg. There is a sciatic nerve for each leg.

Other nerve root symptoms: The irritation or pressure on a nerve next to the spine may also cause pins and needles numbness or weakness in part of a buttock, leg or foot. The exact site and type of symptoms depend on which nerve is affected.

No symptoms:

Research studies have shown that some people have prolapsed discs without any symptoms. It is thought that symptoms are felt if the prolaps causes pressure or irritation of a nerve.This does not happen in all cases.

Physiotherapy:

Physiotherapy can be very beneficial in treating acute herniated discs. Our Physiotherapists will use manual techniques to reduce the herniation and the pain. This normally includes spinal mobilizations, soft tissue techniques, acupuncture and specific exercises . Initially the treatment is aimed at reducing the symptoms and get the patient moving better. Our physiotherapists are experienced at treating back problems of all kinds of severity. The treatment is tailored to you and your specific problem.

After a time, when appropriate, the physiotherapist will work with you to build and strengthen the core muscles of the back and abdomen to reduce the chance of further prolapsed discs. Our in-house-physio-gym provides the perfect environment and equipment for this to take place.

Keeping active:

If you have been diagnosed with a herniated disc it is very important that you keep active. It may be difficult to move immediately after a herniated disc and if the pain is very severe you may have to have complete rest for the first couple of days. However, after this period it is best if you can start moving around as soon as possible to speed up your recovery.

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